Monday, August 3, 2009

dog issues - chicken collar

As I've mentioned before, I've got a young dog that is too interested in chickens. He killed two of them this morning, and I'm going to try the chicken collar as correction.


Both chickens are wired to his collar. The theory is that after a few days of having to carry around the chickens, and smell them, and have them there at all times, that it'll deter his interest in chickens in the future. This is the first time that I've tried this, so I'm curious to see if it'll work.

6 comments:

Across The Creek Farm said...

I got rid of a pyrennes mix pup two weeks ago that started doing the same thing. I just started over with some new pups, but the lady I picked the pups up from said her dad used to put the dead chicken into coon dog mouths and then wire it shut. After two days, she said that the dog would be cured. Not sure about the dog getting water though.
-Spence

Carrie said...

Keep us updated on the chicken collar. I have always heard that it works!

Anonymous said...

We tried this with our lab to no avail. Ended up just fencing in the back yard for her and keeping the birds on their side of the property. I'm thinking wiring the chicken in the mouth may be a viable solution though. Might have to give that a try.

dinkleberries said...

Canine Academy sold me a book called Pooches and other critters. The book says that if a dog will not allow you to put your hand on it's head it's cuz the dog is not in submission to you. That's where I got the idea of putting the dead chicken on the dog's head. That way the dog learns his place is below the dead chicken (let alone the live chicken). I have not had any problems with dogs being chicken killers since I have utilized this technique. Better yet, I do not have to smell or look at a dog with a dead chicken tied to it's neck. Quick simple effective solution in my experience.

Anonymous said...

This technique works *splendidly*, but alas, it will take more than a couple of days. The chickens really need to get rancid and nasty before it has much effect; essentially, one should wire the chickens to the collar and let them rot off. It's disgusting, but once it's all over, that dig will want *nothing* to do with chickens. Good luck; I don't envy you.

Anonymous said...

...Also, often cited in first-year psychology text books is the "conditioned taste aversion" to livestock species induced in apex predators (coyotes, wolves, and the like) by lacing carcasses with LiCl. When the predators consume the meat tainted with LiCl, they become violently, miserably, unimaginably nauseous. The result is a conditioned aversion is so strong that, in some controlled studies, may test subjects (coyotes) later became ill at the mere *sight* of sheep.

Do with this information as you will.